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The Voice of the Black Community

Business

Triangle gets first all-vegan market
 
Published Monday, February 11, 2019
by Mick Schulte, Correspondent

CHAPEL HILL – The Triangle’s first all-vegan market celebrated its grand opening last weekend. Coco Bean Vegan Market, at 1114 Environ Way in Chapel Hill, will offer locally made vegan pastries, coffee, hard cider and wine tasting.

Owners Tamara and Steve Lackey decided to open the market after customers started requesting items at their vegan coffee shop, which is located in the same building.

“The whole coffee shop is vegan, gluten-free and organic, and we had a lot of people asking about the stuff we use and where they can get it, so the market kind of grew naturally out of that,” store manager Penney Henry said.

Lackey spent hours curating the specialty items on the vegan market shelves, including grain bowls, fresh salads, tamales, skincare products, essential oils and more.

“We carry a number of items that you cannot find anywhere else in the area, and I know that because it took me quite an effort to source those items. That said, we also carry items that you can find other places, but often the bigger stores are sold out of those products just as often as they have them in stock,” Lackey said.  

The opening of the market coincides with a growing trend of plant-based food consumption in the United States. According to a report from Nielsen and the Plant Based Foods Association, more than $3.1 billion worth of vegetarian and vegan items were sold in 2017, which resulted in a 20 percent rise in sales over the course of a year.

“We have seen a significant increase in vegetarian and vegan options in the Triangle – and all over the world – in the last five years or so. And every year it seems to triple. Locally, we get a lot of traffic from vegans, plant-based enthusiasts or simply individuals looking to eat less meat and fill their plates with cleaner choices,” Lackey said.

Henry used to be a vegan almost 15 years ago, and even though she doesn’t identify as one anymore, she believes the products offered in the market make the lifestyle easier.

“There’s a big difference between now and when I was a vegan. Everything tastes different now, and there are so many good substitutes you can use. You can’t even tell the difference most of the time,” she said.

The Lackeys and their employees are excited to show some of those vegan substitutes, along with other items.

“We are a small specialty shop that is family and locally owned. We’re happy to take special requests and do our best to accommodate them, not only for our vegan customers but also for people with food sensitivities and allergies,” Lackey said. “We really care about delighting our customers.”

 

Comments

I am an aspiring vegan. I believe that any blacks in America are inspired to open many businesses. But unfortunately the only options we have are to work for both old and new company's. Why is this? Some will say that our people are lazy. Don't want to work for any thing and are afraid of hard work and/or success. But for some reason they fail to mention every intentional blockage put in front of us to stop our success. Instead this is call complaining and blaming others for our failures. Even though, these are facts. All throughout history angry jealous whaite americans have done everything to block our success. But we are supposed to look at this black manager and be happy and or proud that she is still working for a white owner. Deep inside I know that she would rather have her own. Just like many of my people! Perhaps this is just another angry black woman rant. I'll be that because we as a people have a lot to be angry about. And fuck that new grocery store. My people probably will not be able to shop there due to the pricing (haven't checked it yet j/s) and if it is affordable then my people shouldn't shop there. It is time to OWN OUR OWN! and no this is not being racist. It is being REAL! Visit www.1cmbruh.wordpress.com to read about a solution that will help our black community accomplish these goals.
Posted on February 12, 2019
 

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